Jessica Brooks

https://water.weather.gov/ahps2/probability_information.php?wfo=dvn&gage=rcki2 / National Weather Service of the Quad Cities

The chance of major flooding on the Mississippi River in the Quad Cities has dropped dramatically over the past six weeks. Herb Trix reports. 


https://www.weather.gov/media/dvn/Hydro/2020/SpringFloodInfo2Pager_Mar12.pdf / National Weather Service of the Quad Cities

Some of the snow that could cause spring flooding on the Mississippi River has melted. That's according to the final Spring Flood Outlook from the National Weather Service in the Quad Cities

https://www.weather.gov/media/dvn/Hydro/2020/QuadCities_2020SpringFloodOutlook-20200227.pdf / National Weather Service of the Quad Cities

The risk of major flooding on the Mississippi River remains high. That's according to the second Spring Flood Outlook from the National Weather Service in the Quad Cities. (Watch the webinar below for details.)

https://www.weather.gov/media/dvn/Hydro/NWSQuadCitiesAdvancedSpringFloodOutlook_112019.pdf / National Weather Service of the Quad Cities

This wet, cold weather does not bode well for the chances of flooding next spring.

Michelle O'Neill reports meteorologists at the National Weather Service in the Quad Cities are concerned because current, high river levels and precipitation this fall already point to an increased risk of spring flooding.

https://water.weather.gov/ahps2/hydrograph.php?wfo=dvn&gage=rcki2 / National Weather Service Quad Cities

The Mississippi River in the Quad Cities dropped below major flood stage today, only for the second time this spring. 


US Army Corps of Engineers

On Sunday, the Mississippi River at in the Quad Cities fell below major flood stage after being at or above major flood stage for 51 days in a row. That sets a new record for the longest period of time the Mississippi has been at or higher than 18 feet on consecutive days.

Hydrologist Jessica Brooks, from the National Weather Service in Davenport, says that's nearly three weeks longer than the previous record of 31 days set in 2001.

This year, a snowy winter and lots of rain up north led to the new record.

Brooks says 51 days is also significantly longer than the record for the total number of days the Mississippi at Lock and Dam 15 was at or above flood stage, consecutive or not. During the Great Flood of 1993, that number was 37 and occurred from late April through July.

https://www.weather.gov/media/dvn/sitreport/SitReport1.pdf / National Weather Service Quad Cities

After accurately predicting spring flooding on local rivers, the National Weather Service in Davenport is forecasting a second crest on the Mississippi.

https://www.weather.gov/media/dvn/sitreport/SitReport1.pdf / Quad Cities National Weather Service

The risk of flooding in the Quad Cities hasn't changed over the last few weeks.

The National Weather Service office in Davenport says the Spring Flood Outlook for the Mississippi River continues to show a "well above normal chance" of major flooding. But there's a lower risk on tributaries. 

https://bit.ly/2U2fILP / Quad Cities National Weather Service

The second Spring Flood Outlook for the Mississippi River is even worse than the first. Today, the National Weather Service in the Quad Cities released its update, saying the chance of major, or even record, flooding is higher than two weeks ago. 

First Flood Outlook

Feb 16, 2018
National Weather Service

Don't get too worried about possible spring flooding, yet. In its first flood outlook for this year, the National Weather Service says the chance of flooding along the Mississippi and other rivers in this area is "normal to below normal."

Pages