Seefried Industrial Properties

Davenport Aldermen Consider 1,000 New Jobs

A project that could bring up to 1,000 new jobs to the Quad Cities will be discussed Wednesday night by the Davenport city council. The proposed development agreement is with Seefried Industrial Properties, an Atlanta-based builder of large warehouses around the country for other clients, including Amazon. But the future user of this project has not been revealed. The 2.9 million square foot distribution center would be built on 158 acres of land, near the Davenport Airport - west of Division...

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Brandon Nickerson shares his experience as a Registered Nurse in the Neurology/Oncology Unit at Genesis Health System. Getting his Associates Degree in Nursing at Blackhawk College in 2009, Brandon has built a successful career in helping others during their most difficult times.  Receiving multiple awards in recognition of his work, Brandon shares the real benefits of his job.  Join Matt and Melissa for this episode of A Real Piece of Work.  The Junior Achievement student question is provided by Paige Odefey from Pleasant Valley High School.  A special thank you to The Moline Foundation for connecting us with Brandon.

Aaron Renn, a leading urban analyst focused on the Midwest, talks about the region’s economic emergence from the Covid pandemic, competing Red and Blue state strategies for growth, and whether globalization will remain a force or be reduced as a result of the pandemic. He also outlines what city leaders should prioritize to lay the groundwork for growth.

Last month, Ford announced it would allow staff who have been working remotely to remain remote — at least some of the time — long after the pandemic is over.

"Must be nice for them," thought Marcie Pedraza, an electrician at a Ford plant in Chicago. Like many workers across the U.S., from factories to grocery stores, working from home has never been an option for her. And that presents a challenge for companies frantically rewriting their remote work policies: How do you make the change feel fair, when not all employees can benefit?

Cars begin lining up outside the Goodwill donation center in Seabrook, N.H., around 10 a.m. most mornings.

Well-intended patrons are here with truckloads full of treasures.

"We hope everyone brings great things that help our programs, but we know some people make some questionable judgments about what is good to donate," explains Heather Steeves, spokesperson for the 30 Goodwill locations in New Hampshire, Maine and Vermont.

She holds up "a lampshade, which is stained and disgusting and literally falling apart."

AILSA CHANG, HOST:

During the pandemic, a new divide has emerged between those who have to show up to work and those who can log in to Zoom. Now, companies are looking ahead to life after the pandemic. And as NPR's Camila Domonoske reports, this split may be here to stay.

CAMILA DOMONOSKE, BYLINE: Before the pandemic, nearly all American workers commuted. By luxury car or jalopy, by bicycle or bus to a factory or an office or a studio, the vast majority of us had to physically show up for work. Then came the pandemic.

AILSA CHANG, HOST:

During the pandemic, a new divide has emerged between those who have to show up to work and those who can log in to Zoom. Now, companies are looking ahead to life after the pandemic. And as NPR's Camila Domonoske reports, this split may be here to stay.

CAMILA DOMONOSKE, BYLINE: Before the pandemic, nearly all American workers commuted. By luxury car or jalopy, by bicycle or bus to a factory or an office or a studio, the vast majority of us had to physically show up for work. Then came the pandemic.

AILSA CHANG, HOST:

During the pandemic, a new divide has emerged between those who have to show up to work and those who can log in to Zoom. Now, companies are looking ahead to life after the pandemic. And as NPR's Camila Domonoske reports, this split may be here to stay.

CAMILA DOMONOSKE, BYLINE: Before the pandemic, nearly all American workers commuted. By luxury car or jalopy, by bicycle or bus to a factory or an office or a studio, the vast majority of us had to physically show up for work. Then came the pandemic.

AILSA CHANG, HOST:

During the pandemic, a new divide has emerged between those who have to show up to work and those who can log in to Zoom. Now, companies are looking ahead to life after the pandemic. And as NPR's Camila Domonoske reports, this split may be here to stay.

CAMILA DOMONOSKE, BYLINE: Before the pandemic, nearly all American workers commuted. By luxury car or jalopy, by bicycle or bus to a factory or an office or a studio, the vast majority of us had to physically show up for work. Then came the pandemic.

Copyright 2021 KQED. To see more, visit KQED.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

A new study estimates that the number of people who have died of COVID-19 in the U.S. is more than 900,000, a number 57% higher than official figures.

Worldwide, the study's authors say, the COVID-19 death count is nearing 7 million, more than double the reported number of 3.24 million.

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The Power of Words

A WVIK Intelligent Conversation featuring Michele Norris

Carolyn Martin interviews artists from all different genres and all over the Quad Cities about their work.