Roald Tweet

Writer and Narrator of 'Rock Island Lines'

Beginning 1995, historian and folklorist Dr. Roald Tweet spun his stories of the Mississippi Valley to a devoted audience on WVIK. Dr. Tweet published three books as well as numerous literary articles and recorded segments of "Rock Island Lines." His inspiration was that "kidney-shaped limestone island plunked down in the middle of the Mississippi River," a logical site for a storyteller like Dr. Tweet.

It was from Rock Island’s rich heritage that Dr. Tweet spun his histories, biographies and "stretchers." Among his favorite topics were railroads and riverboats, which he combined on a CD in celebration of the Grand Excursion in 2004. "Rock Island Lines with Roald Tweet" received awards from the Illinois Historical Society as well as the Towner Award from the Illinois Humanities Council.

Dr. Tweet was professor emeritus, retired from the Augustana College English department, where he was professor and Conrad Bergendoff Chair in the Humanities. A writer and radio personality, Dr. Tweet was also an accomplished woodcarver and whittler.

Dr. Tweet left us in November of 2020, but his legacy lives on. You can hear many of his Rock Island Lines in podcast form here and also in a forthcoming book from WVIK and East Hall Press.

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  The Writer's Almanac

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Scribble: Barbara Arland-Fye

Jan 10, 2015

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The Writer's Almanac

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  The Writer's Almanac

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Augustana College Professor Emeritus, Roald Tweet offers new Rock Island Lines on WVIK, Quad Cities NPR,  for the celebration of Dubuque Week, September 15-19, 2014.

  

  

  

  

    

Each day of the East West River Fest, Roald Tweet treated us to new editions of Rock Island Lines, especially written for the 3rd Annual East West Riverfest.

On Rock Island

Oct 2, 1995

This is Roald Tweet on Rock Island.

Rock Island is a three-mile-long limestone kidney plunked down in the Upper Mississippi River, midway between St. Paul, Minnesota, and St. Louis, Missouri, the only stone island in the whole river.  

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