Election News

Find our buildout from this hour, featuring a partial transcription, here.

With Meghna Chakrabarti

From President Trump’s “go back” tweets to the dispute between the “squad” and House Speaker Pelosi. We take a look at race and racism in Washington.

Guests

Amid Furor Over Racist Tweets, White House Announces Immigration Bill

Jul 16, 2019

Updated at 2:30 p.m. ET

The White House announced Tuesday that it has quietly drafted a 620-page immigration bill and has lined up 10 Republican senators to co-sponsor the measure should it be introduced, according to a senior administration official involved in the process.

Updated at 6:54 p.m. ET

The House passed a resolution condemning President Trump's "racist comments" on Tuesday evening. The nonbinding resolution states that Trump's remarks directed at members of Congress "have legitimized fear and hatred of new Americans and people of color."

With his latest round of attacks on four first-year members of Congress who are women of color, President Trump has once again touched the raw nerve of racism in American life.

He has also tapped into one of the oldest strains in our politics — the fear and vilification of immigrants and their descendants.

At a Border Patrol holding facility in El Paso, Texas, an agent told a Honduran family that one parent would be sent to Mexico while the other parent and their three children could stay in the United States, according to the family. The agent turned to the couple's youngest daughter — 3-year-old Sofia, whom they call Sofi — and asked her to make a choice.

Holcomb's Path To Re-election Likely An Easy One

Jul 15, 2019

Gov. Eric Holcomb officially launched his re-election bid Saturday and political analysts say Holcomb’s path to a second term is likely an easy one.

Updated at 7 p.m. ET

A group of four women lawmakers responded to attacks by President Trump with a news conference of their own on Monday evening.

Earlier in the day, Trump said the members of Congress are "free to leave" the country if they are unhappy with the U.S. and accused them of hating America.

Tennessee's Republican governor, Bill Lee, is facing public backlash after he declared Saturday "Nathan Bedford Forrest Day," continuing a decades-old tradition honoring the Confederate general, slave trader and onetime leader of the Ku Klux Klan.

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

Updated July 15 at 8:55 a.m. ET

A group of four minority Democratic congresswomen targeted by President Trump in a series of Sunday morning tweets denounced his racist remarks and accused him of "stoking white nationalism."

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