weather

https://www.weather.gov/dvn/weatherstory / National Weather Service of the Quad Cities

March was a little bit warmer and wetter than usual, and that's what we can expect for the next three months, too. 

https://tinyurl.com/st3hdbp & https://tinyurl.com/tfph62x / National Weather Service of the Quad Cities

This winter was drier and warmer than usual in the Quad Cities. 

https://www.weather.gov/media/dvn/Hydro/2020/QuadCities_2020SpringFloodOutlook-20200227.pdf / National Weather Service of the Quad Cities

The risk of major flooding on the Mississippi River remains high. That's according to the second Spring Flood Outlook from the National Weather Service in the Quad Cities. (Watch the webinar below for details.)

https://www.weather.gov/media/dvn/sitreport/SitReport1.pdf / National Weather Service of the Quad Cities

For more information click HEREWinter Snow WATCH SitReport by Michelle O'Neill on Scribd (Source)

https://www.weather.gov/media/dvn/sitreport/SitReport1.pdf / National Weather Service of the Quad Cities

Winter storm warnings will go into effect later today with rain, sleet, ice, and snow in the forecast. 

file:///C:/Users/wvik_news/Desktop/SitReport1.pdf / National Weather Service of the Quad Cities

Here's the latest "situation report" from the U.S. National Weather Service of the Quad Cities:

Sit Report 1 by WVIKnews on Scribd

https://www.weather.gov/dvn/Climate_Monthly_08_2019 / Quad Cities National Weather Service

After a wet spring, the Quad Cities area had a dry summer. Meteorologist David Sheets, from the National Weather Service in Davenport, says August was slightly cooler on average, and it rained slightly less than usual. 

Follow Dorian & Other Storms Headed for the East Coast

Aug 30, 2019

https://www.weather.gov/dvn/drought / National Weather Service of the Quad Cities

The National Weather Service Drought Monitor says the Quad Cities area is "abnormally dry" to in a state of "moderate drought."

https://twitter.com/MoCorrections/status/1134542599086325761 / Missouri Dept. of Corrections Tweet

During this year's record-breaking flood, the Mississippi River Cities and Towns Initiative is promoting solutions to deal with the increased frequency and severity of floods, plus the damage they cause.

Michelle O'Neill reports one possibility is for Congress to create a revolving loan fund for identifying, restoring, and creating wetlands within the Mississippi River basin.


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