National Weather Service

Quad Cities National Weather Service

For the second year in a row, the risk of major flooding on the Mississippi River is high. Today, the National Weather Service in the Quad Cities released its first Spring Flood Outlook.

Michelle O'Neill reports the agency held a press conference at its office in Davenport following last year's record flood. 


Quad Cities National Weather Service

The National Weather Service in the Quad Cities is working out a couple of kinks after issuing its first Snow Squall Warning Monday. 

National Weather Service

It was a wet fall in the Quad Cities. The National Weather Service recorded 13.3 inches of rain during September, October, and November. 

https://www.weather.gov/media/dvn/Hydro/NWSQuadCitiesAdvancedSpringFloodOutlook_112019.pdf / National Weather Service of the Quad Cities

This wet, cold weather does not bode well for the chances of flooding next spring.

Michelle O'Neill reports meteorologists at the National Weather Service in the Quad Cities are concerned because current, high river levels and precipitation this fall already point to an increased risk of spring flooding.

National Weather Service

After falling three quarters of a foot since Sunday, the Mississippi River in the Quad Cities is expected to hold at half a foot above flood stage into next week.

National Weather Service

Thanks to more rain in recent weeks, river levels around the Quad Cities are still above flood stage and not likely to fall much through next week.

https://www.weather.gov/dvn/Climate_Monthly_08_2019 / Quad Cities National Weather Service

After a wet spring, the Quad Cities area had a dry summer. Meteorologist David Sheets, from the National Weather Service in Davenport, says August was slightly cooler on average, and it rained slightly less than usual. 

https://www.weather.gov/dvn/drought / National Weather Service of the Quad Cities

The National Weather Service Drought Monitor says the Quad Cities area is "abnormally dry" to in a state of "moderate drought."

Michelle O'Neill / WVIK News

The head of the Quad Cities Chamber of Commerce is making it clear, Davenport businesses want the city to take quick action on long term flood protection.

National Weather Service

Finally, the Mississippi River in the Quad Cities has fallen below flood stage for the first time since March 15th. Tuesday around 5 p.m., the water dropped below 15 feet.

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