Scott Neuman

Scott Neuman is a reporter and editor, working mainly on breaking news for NPR's digital and radio platforms.

He brings to NPR years of experience as a journalist at a variety of news organizations based all over the world. He came to NPR from The Associated Press in Bangkok, Thailand, where he worked as an editor on the news agency's Asia Desk. Prior to that, Neuman worked in Hong Kong with The Wall Street Journal, where among other things he reported extensively from Pakistan in the wake of the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks. He also spent time with the AP in New York, and in India as a bureau chief for United Press International.

A native Hoosier, Neuman's roots in public radio (and the Midwest) run deep. He started his career at member station WBNI in Fort Wayne, and worked later in Illinois for WNIU/WNIJ in DeKalb/Rockford and WILL in Champaign-Urbana.

Neuman is a graduate of Purdue University. He lives with his wife, Noi, on the Chesapeake Bay in Maryland.

We've already had one "supermoon" this summer and there's another one due next month, but the one you might see Sunday night has astronomy fans running out of lunar superlatives. National Geographic is calling it an "extra-supermoon."

As NatGeo explains:

Updated at 4:40 p.m. ET.

The chief of the St. Louis County Police says a black teenager fatally shot by officers Saturday was killed during an altercation with authorities.

But as Chief Jon Belmar was speaking at a news conference Sunday morning, a few hundred angry protesters carrying signs converged on the police station taunting police with chants of "Don't shoot me," according to The Associated Press.

The government in the West African nation of Guinea is denying reports that it has sealed its borders with neighboring Liberia and Sierra Leone in response to the Ebola outbreak.

Guinea's health minister said Saturday that it had closed its borders with the two countries to prevent infected people from entering. State television in Guinea later said, however, that it had only instituted special health measures at border posts, according to the BBC.

Updated at 1:40 p.m. ET.

Israeli officials have confirmed a new three-day cease-fire with Hamas in the Gaza Strip, a move that clears the way for a resumption on talks to end the weekslong conflict.

Update at 11:50 a.m. ET.

A Baghdad government minister says at least 500 members of Iraq's minority Yazidis have been killed by Islamic militants.

Updated at 3:50 p.m. ET.

Amid reports that Ukraine army forces are closing in on rebel-held Donetsk, the leader of the separatist insurgents says his fighters would accept a cease-fire to avoid a looming humanitarian crisis.

The Associated Press says:

"There was no immediate government response to the statement Saturday from Aleksandr Zakharchenko, the so-called prime minister of the Donetsk separatists.

Updated at 12:25 p.m. ET.

President Obama says that the U.S. will continue to provide Iraq with humanitarian and military assistance, but he ruled out ground troops and reiterated administration calls for Iraq to form a "legitimate" government in order to face the threat from Islamic militants.

NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory has released a video of its test of a new inflatable braking system designed to land heavy payloads on Mars.

Updated at 4:55 p.m. ET.

The end of the latest cease-fire in the Gaza Strip has been marked by intense Israeli airstrikes against Hamas targets.

The U.S. and United Nations have condemned the resumption of hostilities that comes at the end of a three-day truce on Friday.

Updated at 11:45 a.m. ET.

U.S. forces conducted additional humanitarian airdrops to northern Iraq today to aid members of the Yazidi religious minority trapped by Islamic militants battling Iraqi troops.

President Obama today said the U.S. commitment would not involve ground troops and said that it would likely take "some months" to sort out the country's humanitarian and military crises.

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