Rich Egger

Rich is the News Director at Tri States Public Radio. Rich grew up in the northwest suburbs of Chicago but now calls Macomb home. Rich has a B.A in Communication Studies with an Emphasis on Radio, TV, and Film from Northern Illinois University. Rich came to love radio in high school where he developed his “news nerdiness” as he calls it. Rich’s high school had a radio station called WFVH, which he worked at for a couple years. In college, Rich worked at campus station WKDI for three years, spinning tunes and serving at various times as General Manager, Music Director and Operations Manager. Before being hired as Tri States Public Radio’s news director in 1998, Rich worked professionally in news at WRMN-AM/WJKL-FM in Elgin and WJBC-AM in Bloomington. In Rich’s leisure time he loves music, books, cross-country skiing, rooting for the Cubs and Blackhawks, and baking sugar frosted chocolate bombs. His future plans include “getting some tacos.”

Western Illinois University has seen a sharp drop in student enrollment in recent years, which means less money coming in through tuition and fees.  That, combined with decreases in state financial support – especially during the two-year state budget impasse – hurt the university's finances, leading to layoffs, furloughs, and an early retirement program.

More than 80 people – many of them Macomb High School students -- braved the cold, blustery, and rainy conditions Saturday morning to demonstrate as part of the national March for Our Lives movement.  The local protest was organized by students.  They're calling for political action to end gun violence and mass shootings in schools and society.

Jeanie Plate, known to many commuters as the Good Hope crossing guard, passed away on the final day of February.  She was 73.  She became popular because of a simple gesture – she waved to each and every person driving by.

Many newsroom staffs have been cut in the past 15 or 20 years.  That makes it more difficult for the remaining reporters to do their job, which includes fact-checking politicians.

Hundreds of people marched through the streets of downtown Galesburg Saturday morning in conjunction with the Women's March in Washington D.C. and similar demonstrations around the globe.

The state of Illinois has gone 18 months without a budget.  And the stop gap spending plan is about to expire with no new deal in sight.

Marc Nelson's goal is to teach his students at Central Junior High School in Kewanee that there is more to art than paintings hanging from a gallery wall.

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