Government & Politics

Goverment & Political news

Jerry Seib, Washington Editor of the Wall Street Journal and author of the Capital Journal column, talks about this new book, We Should Have Seen It Coming: From Reagan to Trump—A Front-row Seat to a Political Revolution. Topics include the early signs of change in the GOP, cultural and economic cracks that emerged, and how the party moves forward.

John Barry, author of The Great Influenza: The Story of the Deadliest Pandemic in History, discusses his landmark book and lessons for dealing with the current coronavirus pandemic. He also discusses the individuals involved during that time, from scientists to business leaders to elected officials, and how their efforts aided or held back addressing the pandemic.

Ross DeVol, President and CEO of Heartland Forward, a new ‘think and do’ think tank devoted to improving economic performance in the middle of the country, talks about how former factory towns and rural areas can revitalize their economies. He also discusses how to promote small business retention and growth, entrepreneurialism, globalization and tech.

Vaccines for the coronavirus are being rolled out much faster than usual, but don't worry. That's according to Doctor Louis Katz, Medical Director of the Scott County Health Department. He says the process is careful but streamlined compared to past drug approvals.

He calls it a "public health emergency" that during the last nine months, more than 250,000 people have died in the US due to COVID-19.

Josh Kraushaar, political reporter for the National Journal and host of the Against the Grain podcast, talks about the 2020 election, Trump’s legacy, realignment, polling, white working class voters and the role of the news media.

Dante Chinni, a political writer for the Wall Street Journal and NBC News contributor, analyzes the 2020 election results including the differences among American suburbs and Latino voters as well as challenges facing both parties moving forward. Chinni also directs the American Communities Project at George Washington University.

Property taxes will probably go down next year in Moline. Tuesday night the city council will discuss a propossed budget for next year with a lower levy and tax rate.

The budget for East Moline will probably not change very much next year. Monday night, the city council discussed spending 45.5 million dollars in 2021, an increase of about four and-a-half per cent.

Amanda Vinicky, WTTW Chicago Tonight correspondent and former political reporter for NPR Illinois and the Illinois public radio network, talks about the 2020 election results in Illinois and the impact on state government in 2021. She provides analysis on the Fair Tax Amendment, Justice Kilbride retention, the role of Speaker Madigan and much more.

http://comap.sasaki.com/davenport/ / Sasaki

People affected by last year's record flood in Davenport are invited to tell the city about their experiences, and what they think about flood protection. 

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