Election News

When Donald Trump arrived in Scotland Friday morning, hours after the United Kingdom voted to leave the European Union, the presumptive Republican presidential nominee was quick to draw parallels between the U.K.'s political earthquake, and his own campaign for president.

"People want to take their country back," Trump said, "They want to have independence, in a sense. And you see it in Europe, all over Europe."

Kansas lawmakers, trying to head off a court shutdown of the state's public schools, have increased aid to poor districts by $38 million.

Four school districts sued the state in 2010 for more funding, and the state Supreme Court threatened to close the schools as of the end of June until state officials found a way to address inequities on the quality of education offered to children of different economic classes.

Donald Trump Jr. was in the room when his father, the Republican Party’s presumptive nominee for president, fired his campaign manager this week. Ivanka Trump has been described as “the quiet power behind the Trump throne.” And Eric Trump, the candidate’s third child, has said he and his siblings—while more reserved than their bombastic father—are frequent advisers to the campaign.

David Cameron's Dramatic Rise And Fall

Jun 24, 2016

Britain's Prime Minister David Cameron was at his political peak just last year as he led his Conservative Party to an outright majority in Parliament for the first time in more than two decades, surpassing all the forecasts.

Today, his political career is effectively over, the result of another surprise at the ballot box — the United Kingdom's vote to leave the European Union.

In 2013, a young woman named Abigail Fisher sued the University of Texas after claiming she was denied admission to the school in 2008 because she was white.

"There were people in my class with lower grades who weren't in all the activities I was in, and who were being accepted into UT," said Fisher. "And the only other difference between us was the color of our skin."

High Hopes For Hemp

Jun 24, 2016

Bernie Sanders said he'll vote for Hillary Clinton in November — but more than two weeks after she became the presumptive Democratic nominee, Sanders remains in the race.

Sanders was on MSNBC when Nicolle Wallace, a former Republican aide and now network political analyst, asked Sanders, "Are you going to vote for Hillary Clinton in November?"

His answer: "Yes."

He added, "The issue right here is, I think I am going to do everything I can to defeat Donald Trump."

Updated 9:42 a.m. ET

Voters in the U.K. have decided to leave the European Union, a decision that has shocked Europe, shaken global markets and pushed Prime Minister David Cameron to announce his upcoming resignation.

The EU referendum vote was decisive — 52 percent to 48 percent in favor of dissolving the United Kingdom's 43-year membership in the European community. But Northern Ireland and Scotland voted in favor of remaining, raising the specter that the United Kingdom itself may break apart.

This November's presidential election comes on the heels of a year of incomparable black activism.

Young activists are protesting in the streets, organizing on college campuses and disrupting campaign rallies to push for change in powerful ways.

You might expect this political energy to be reflected at the ballot box. But some activists, like Koya Graham, don't see much of a point in voting for president.

When Graham turned 18, the first thing she did was register to vote. And, year-after-year, she was a loyal voter — until this primary season.

Senators Reach Deal On National GMO Labeling Bill

Jun 23, 2016

Just a week before a Vermont law kicks in requiring labels on food containing genetically modified ingredients, U.S. Senate agriculture leaders announced a deal Thursday that takes the power out of states' hands — and sets a mandatory national system for GM disclosures on food products.

Sen. Pat Roberts, R-Kansas, the chairman of the U.S. Senate Committee on Agriculture, Nutrition, and Forestry, unveiled the plan that had been negotiated for weeks with U.S. Sen. Debbie Stabenow, D-Michigan.

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